In Part I of this post, we talked about how easy it is to remove distractions from your worship services by using a click track.

We'll even get into how easy it is to implement click tracks into your current setup in Part III of this post.

But right now... it's time to dig into how your worship team greatly benefits from using click track.

 

 Have you ever had someone on your team tell you, "I just can't play with a metronome.  It makes me terrible!"?  I understand what they're saying; compared to their "internal metronome", a real-life metronome might be ticking at a very different pace.

But here's the obligatory question - in that scenario, is their internal metronome correct, or is the real-life metronome correct?

The answer is obvious, of course.  Working with a click track forces us to align our internal metronome (which may or may not be correct) with a real-life metronome (which is always correct!).

So for those who say they can't play with a metronome, what they're in fact saying is that they don't want to put in the time & effort to align their internal metronome with a real metronome.

I don't see this as an acceptable attitude in musicianship (and especially in ministry), though.  This is essentially the musical equivalent of saying, "I know that 4+4=8 on a calculator ten times out of ten.. but I feel like it should equal 7.  Or maybe 9.  Or whatever."  I would almost go as far as to say this: by refusing to play with a click track, you are saying that common time is wrong and that you are right.

One common argument that comes up is some people like the idea of playing at the right tempo, but don't like the constant clicking in their ears, saying it throws them off balance.  My response is this: Try it.  Practice with a click track for 30 days.  Every time you practice on your own or rehearse with the worship team, play that click track.  If you still feel like a click track throws you off after 30 days, then let's talk.  But I have not yet seen someone who, after a month of using click, still felt thrown off-kilter by it.  Most of the time, they are singing the metronome's praises after that month!

You will absolutely see the rise of individual excellence from each team member as they practice with click tracks (yes, even vocalists!).  Lining up their internal tempo correctly will give them a strong footing on growing as a musician.

 

One other major team benefit from using click tracks is not only the growth of individual excellence, but of team excellence.  By ensuring the entire team is working off the same tempo, you will undoubtedly feel a surge of cohesiveness within your worship team and enjoy making music together so much more!  

Imagine a day when you don't have to question the tempo anymore, but simply go with what the click track tells you.  You are ensured everyone on your team will be on the same tempo, which lends itself to greater team growth (and, I would argue, less to worry about in the course of your worship gathering and more freedom to engage in worshiping God instead of just leading people in worship).

 

One bonus thought on click track team benefits - by everyone on the team saying "YES" to click tracks, they are in essence saying, "I know that you and you and you are saying yes to click tracks, and because I value you and want to work on cohesiveness with you, I'm going to say yes too."  This is an important fact not to miss - by saying yes to click tracks, your team is saying yes to intentionally growing together.

 

Yes, it takes time.  Yes, it takes commitment.  But YES, it is worth it to use click tracks in your service!

 

In Part III of this post, we'll talk about the options (and boy, are there options!) you have for implementing click track with your team.


What do you think?  How have you seen click tracks impact your team's growth (or the lack of click tracks impede your growth)?  Comment below!